Friday, November 29, 2013

Ginisang Labanos (Sauteed Radish)


I bought a kilo  of radish or labanos the other day so I decided to divide it for pork sinigang and ginisang labanos  or sauteed radish. I love making ginisang labanos  because it is simple yet nutritious. To make this dish, just cut labanos  or radish into thin slices and saute it with ground chicken or pork to add flavor to the dish. 

I consider radish or labanos  to be a versatile vegetable. It can be sauteed and added in soups and stew. It can also be made into a salad (ensaladang labanos).

Ingredients
  • 1 large radish, sliced crosswise
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup ground pork
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 cup water
  • fish sauce

Preparation

1. In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat and saute garlic and onion.    

2. Add ground pork and cook until lightly browned.

3. Add radish, fish sauce and water. Simmer for about 10-15 minutes.

4. Serve.

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Chinese Cabbage and Ginger Stir-Fry

Napa or Chinese cabbage is a leafy green vegetable belonging to the Brassica family. To differentiate it from other leafy vegetables like cabbage, lettuce, pechay and bokchoy, Napa cabbage has a sweet taste and is crunchy. It can be sauteed, stir-fried, steamed, added to salads, soup or stew, used as a salad wrap and pickled to make the famous Korean kimchi. It is a popular ingredient in Asian cuisine. It also offers a lot of health benefits.This leafy green vegetable is a good source of  vitamins A and C. It also reduces your risk of cancer.  

This Napa cabbage recipe takes only about 20 minutes to make. Fresh ginger is added to give the dish an Asian flavor. You can pair this dish with fried or grilled foods. Enjoy!

Ingredients
  • 1 whole Chinese cabbage, sliced
  • few slices of ginger
  • 1/4 cup ground pork
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 cup water
  • salt and pepper
Preparation

1. In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Stir in garlic, onion and ginger.

2. Add ground pork and cook until golden brown.

3. Add water and simmer for about 10-15 minutes.

4. Add Chinese cabbage and cook until tender.

5. Season with salt and pepper.

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Adobong Kangkong


When I was 12 years old, the first dish that I learned to cook was adobong kangkong. On my first try, the kangkong leaves were overcooked. On my second, I added too much soy sauce. Later on, I 'mastered' cooking adobong kangkong.

In this recipe, instead of just kangkong leaves, ground pork is added to enhance the flavor of the dish. I don't know which tastes better but I do love both versions. Enjoy!

 Ingredients
  • 1 bunch kangkong, sliced
  • 1/2 cup ground pork
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp vinegar
  • 1 cup water
  • salt/fish sauce
  • sugar (optional)

Preparation

1. In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat and saute garlic and onion.

2. Stir in ground pork and cook until lightly browned.

3. Add water and salt/fish sauce. Simmer for 15 minutes.

4. Add kangkong, soy sauce and vinegar. Cook until tender.

5. Serve.

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Adobong Sitaw



Aside from cooking adobo using chicken, pork or seafood, you can also try other vegetables such as stringbeans or green beans. This vegetable dish is similar to adobong kangkong but unlike kangkong (which has to be cooked lightly), stringbeans should be cooked slightly tender and crunchy. Overcooking it will result to mushy beans which we want to avoid.

You need the same ingredients in cooking adobo such as soy sauce, vinegar and garlic. You can also add ground pork or chicken if you want to make it tastier. This goes well with fried fish. Enjoy!

Ingredients
  • 1 bunch stringbeans, cut into 2 inch length
  • 1/2 cup ground pork
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup vinegar
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup water
  • salt and pepper
  • sugar (optional)
Preparation

1. In a skillet, heat oil and saute garlic over medium heat.

2. Stir in the ground pork and cook until lightly browned.

3. Add soy sauce, vinegar and water. Simmer for about 10-15 minutes.

4. Add stringbeans and cook until tender.

5. Serve.

Sunday, November 24, 2013

Pinaputok na Tilapia

 
My first 'encounter' with this dish was when my family and I had our Sunday lunch at a Filipino restaurant. My sister who was familiar with this dish told me that I should come up with my own version of this dish. After I feasted on the pinaputok na tilapia which was in front of me, I tried to dissect  all the ingredients in this dish. A week after, I bought some onions, tomatoes and ginger (preferably luyang dilaw) and some medium-sized tilapia. I did some chopping, wrapping and frying and came up with my own version of this dish. 

I think the reason why this dish is called pinaputok na tilapia is because one has to stuff the cavity of the fish with a large amount of onion, tomatoes and ginger. Pinaputok in English means to burst or explode.

Ingredients
  • 1 large tilapia (scales removed)
  • 3 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 small ginger, chopped
  • salt and pepper

Preparation

1. Make a large slit on each side of the tilapia.

2. Rub each side of the tilapia with salt and pepper (including
    the stomach). Set aside.

3. In a bowl, combine chopped onions, tomatoes and ginger.
    Season with salt and pepper.

4. Put the mixture inside each slit of the tilapia. Wrap the tilapia
    with aluminum foil.

5. Fry each side of the tilapia for 5-10 minutes.

6. Serve with toyomansi (soy sauce and calamansi).




Tortang Talong (Eggplant Omelet)



The other day, I was able to harvest some eggplant from my mini-garden. I was ecstatic that the pests did not damage my row of eggplant. Although, they bore some holes on my lettuce patch. On my way to the kitchen, I decided to make tortang talong or eggplant omelet. 

An omelet is made from beaten eggs cooked in cooking oil. In the Philippines, omelet is known as torta. Hence, tortang talong or eggplant omelet consists of eggplant, beaten eggs and seasoning. The eggplant is initially grilled then the skin peeled off. It is then dipped in beaten eggs and fried. This dish is usually eaten during breakfast and best served with garlic fried rice or sinangag.

Ingredients
  • 2 pcs eggplant
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • salt and pepper
  • vegetable oil

Preparation

1. Grill the eggplant until it turns black. Allow to cool and peel off
    the skin. Set aside.

2. Using a fork, flatten the eggplant on a platter.

3. Beat the eggs in a bowl and season with salt and pepper. Dip the
    eggplant into the egg mixture.

4. In a frying pan, heat oil over medium heat and fry the eggplant on
    each side.

5. Serve with catsup.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Pancit Bihon

According to the Chinese, noodles symbolize long life. They also believe that noodles should be eaten during one's birthday. When we were growing up, pancit bihon was a regular fare on the table especially during our birthday. It was usually served on a large platter or bandehado and served with calamansi and soy sauce. It was often paired with fried chicken and lumpiang shanghai.  Sometimes, even without an occasion, we would cook pancit bihon. Each of us would help in chopping all the ingredients for the pancit. It was fun!
Nowadays, we still cook pancit bihon with or without an occasion. It truly brings back childhood memories. Hope you try it. 

Ingredients
  • 2 cups chicken, cut into desired size
  • 1/4 cup ground pork
  • 250 gms rice sticks (bihon)
  • 1 cup carrots, sliced
  • 1 cup snow peas (sitsaro)
  • 1 cup Baguio beans, sliced diagonally
  • 2 cups cabbage, sliced
  • 1/2 cup celery, chopped finely
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 3 cups water
  • 4 tbsp soy sauce
  • calamansi
  • salt 
Preparation

1. Soak rice sticks (bihon) in water for 10 minutes. Set aside.

2. In a large pot, heat oil over medium heat and saute garlic and onion.

3. Stir in the chicken and ground pork. Cook until lightly browned. 

4. Add water and salt. Simmer for about 20-30 minutes.

5. Add carrots, snow peas, Baguio beans, cabbage and celery. Cook
    until tender.

6. Remove all the meat and vegetables from the pot. Set aside.

7. Add rice sticks (bihon) and soy sauce to the remaining liquid
    in the pot.

8. Once cooked, add all the meat and vegetables.

8. Serve with calamansi. 

Monday, November 18, 2013

Pinaupong Manok

I first learned of this dish from my Mom who was raving about it when she attended her friend's birthday. My Mom excitedly told me, "Donna, you should try this chicken recipe. Masarap (It's delicious!)." "What are the ingredients," I curiously asked. She replied, "salt and tanglad (lemon grass)." So I looked it up on the internet and learned a great deal about this dish. 

It's only in the Philippines where you can find a dish whose English translation literally means "sitting chicken." There are several variations of this dish. Some sit  the chicken on a bed of rock salt while others stuff the chicken with onions, ginger, tomatoes with a lot of spices. Another way to cook this dish is marinating the chicken in soy sauce and pepper. Am sure all of these taste good. My own version consists of chicken, rock salt and tanglad or lemon grass. Hope you try it!  

Ingredients
  • 1 whole chicken
  • 4-5 stalks lemon grass (tie in a knot)
  • rock salt (depends on the amount of salt you need)
Dipping sauce
  • soy sauce
  • calamansi

Preparation

1. Insert lemon grass into the cavity of the chicken.

2. Evenly spread rock salt all over the chicken.

3. Put the chicken in a palayok (earthenware pot) or stainless
    steel pot and cook over medium heat for about 1 1/2 hours
    while occasionally turning the chicken.

4. Serve and enjoy!



Sunday, November 17, 2013

Ginisang Sayote (Sauteed Chayote)



Chayote or sayote belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family. Melons, cucumbers and squash are relatives.The fruit of chayote can be eaten raw, boiled, fried, or pickled. It is a rich source of vitamin C.

Ginisang sayote or sauteed chayote is an easy-to-prepare dish. To make the dish tastier, chayote is sauteed with ground pork, chicken or shrimp. It goes well with fried or grilled foods.

Ingredients
  • 2 pcs sayote, sliced
  • 1/4 cup ground pork
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 1 tomato, sliced
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • fish sauce 
  • salt and pepper
Preparation

1. In a skillet, heat oil and saute garlic, onion and tomato over
    medium heat.

2. Add ground pork and cook until lightly browned.

3. Add water and fish sauce. Simmer for about 15 minutes.

4. Add sayote and cook until tender.

5. Season with salt and pepper.

Friday, November 15, 2013

Chicken Tinola


Chicken tinola is an authentic Filipino dish. This dish usually consists of chicken, green papaya, chili pepper leaves (siling labuyo), ginger, onion and fish sauce. Chayote is often substituted for green papaya and malunggay leaves for chili pepper leaves.

There are several variations of cooking tinola. In some parts in the Visayas, lemon grass (tanglad) is added while the Tagalog version has ginger and chili pepper leaves in the broth. Am sure all of these are good to eat.

For this recipe, chicken is sauteed with onion, ginger and fish sauce. Water (rice washing can also be used) is then added and simmered. Once the chicken is cooked, papaya and chili pepper leaves are added. This is best served with plain rice and dried fish such as tuyo, danggit and daing. Enjoy!   

Ingredients
  • 500 gms chicken, cut into serving pieces
  • 1 small papaya, cut into wedges
  • few slices of ginger
  • 1 cup chili pepper (siling labuyo) leaves
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 5 cups water
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • fish sauce (patis)

Preparation

1. In a pot, heat oil and saute garlic, onion and ginger over medium heat.

2. Add chicken and cook until lightly browned

3. Stir in water and fish sauce and simmer for 45 minutes.

4. Add papaya and cook until it softens. Add chili pepper leaves and
    remove from heat.

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Chicken Adobo with Lemon Grass


According to Wikipedia, "adobo refers to a common cooking process indigenous to the Philippines." Based on historical accounts, when the Spaniards came to the Philippines, they noticed a unique cooking process - stewing with vinegar. Thinking it was the same as their Spanish adobo, they referred to it as adobo.

Chicken, pork, squid and vegetables like kangkong and stringbeans can be made into adobo. This recipe - chicken adobo with lemon grass is another variation. Instead of  plain chicken adobo, I added  lemon grass or tanglad in it to have a citrus-like flavor. Hope you like it.


Ingredients
  • 500 gms chicken, cut into serving pieces
  • 4 stalks lemon grass (tanglad) 
  • 5 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • salt and pepper

Preparation

1. In a pot, combine chicken, soy sauce, vinegar, water, garlic, 
    lemon grass, sugar, salt and  pepper.

2. Cook over low heat for about 45 minutes.

3. Serve and enjoy!

Monday, November 11, 2013

Ginataang Kalabasa at Sitaw



Ginataang Sitaw at Kalabasa (string beans and squash in coconut milk) is a very simple, delicious, and nutritious vegetable recipe. The dish is a combination of string beans and squash simmered in coconut milk. To make the recipe even more nutritious, shrimp can be used instead of pork. Pork is optional, as well. You can discard the pork for a healthier version. Another variation of this dish is using crab. In this case, the dish is called Ginataang Alimasag. It  basically has the same taste with the exception of the crab. Some locals don’t use shrimp paste in the dish, but I personally prefer it as a substitute for fish sauce as it makes it somewhat unique and more tasty. - See more at: http://cooknshare.com/recipe/ginataang-sitaw-kalabasa/#sthash.X6aygMzd.dpuf
Ginataang Sitaw at Kalabasa (string beans and squash in coconut milk) is a very simple, delicious, and nutritious vegetable recipe. The dish is a combination of string beans and squash simmered in coconut milk. To make the recipe even more nutritious, shrimp can be used instead of pork. Pork is optional, as well. You can discard the pork for a healthier version. Another variation of this dish is using crab. In this case, the dish is called Ginataang Alimasag. It  basically has the same taste with the exception of the crab. Some locals don’t use shrimp paste in the dish, but I personally prefer it as a substitute for fish sauce as it makes it somewhat unique and more tasty. - See more at: http://cooknshare.com/recipe/ginataang-sitaw-kalabasa/#sthash.X6aygMzd.dpuf
According to Wikipedia, "ginataan alternatively spelled guinataan, is a Filipino term which refers to food cooked with gata - the Filipino word for coconut milk." In the Philippines, there are several dishes cooked with gata such as ginataang hipon (shrimp cooked in coconut milk), ginataang gulay (vegetables cooked in coconut milk), ginataang alimango (crabs cooked in coconut milk) and the list goes on. 

Ginataang kalabasa at sitaw is a classic example of a Filipino dish cooked in coconut milk. This recipe consists of kalabasa (squash) and sitaw (stringbeans) cooked in gata or coconut milk. Pork, shrimp or crab is added to make it more flavorful and delicious. This is a healthy and nutritious dish. Hope you try this dish.

Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup ground pork
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 1/2 kalabasa (squash), cubed
  • 8-10 pcs stringbean, cut 1 inch long
  • 1 cup coconut milk
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • salt and pepper

Preparation

1. In a saucepan, saute garlic and onion in vegetable oil over medium
    heat.

2. Add ground pork and cook until lightly browned.

3. Add water, coconut milk and fish sauce. Simmer for about 20
    minutes.

5. Add squash followed by stringbeans. Cook until tender.

6. Season with salt and pepper.

Sunday, November 10, 2013

Mungbean Sprouts and Cabbage Stir-Fry


Mungbean seeds are sometimes germinated for a few days (usually 2-3 days) and often utilized in Asian cooking. These are known as bean sprouts. These sprouts are crispy and have a nutty flavor. They are good sources of vitamins C and K. It is also low in calories and rich in fiber. 

In Asian cuisine, they are often stir-fried, added in soups, smoothies and sandwiches. It can also be eaten raw and added in salads.

Here in the Philippines, mungbean sprouts are known as togue. It is usually stir-fried, sauteed and added in salads. For this recipe, mungbean sprouts and cabbage are stir-fried with chicken marinated in soy sauce and sugar. This dish is easy-to-prepare and is best eaten with rice. Hope you try it.

Ingredients
  • 1 cup mungbean sprouts
  • 1/2 cup cabbage, sliced thinly
  • 1/2 cup chicken breast, sliced thinly
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1/4 tsp sugar
  • salt and pepper

Preparation

1. Marinate chicken breast in soy sauce and sugar. Set aside.

2. In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat and add garlic and onion.

3. Stir in the marinated chicken breast and cook until golden brown.

4. Add the mungbean sprouts and cook until crisp and tender.

5. Add cabbage and cook for a few minutes.

5. Season with salt and pepper.

Chicken Afritada

Afritada is derived from the Spanish word, fritada which means fried. This is a misnomer since afritada is a meat stew consisting of onions, tomatoes, red bell pepper and potatoes. It is often confused with other tomato-based dishes such as mechado and kaldereta. Although all of them are Spanish-influenced, they vary on how it is prepared.

According to Wikipedia, "afritada is the name given to a tomato-based dish when chicken and pork is used." In the Philippines, chicken afritada is a tomato-based dish with carrots, green peas, red bell pepper and potatoes. This is a popular dish during weddings, fiestas, family gatherings and other celebrations. Hope you try it.


Ingredients
  • 500 gms chicken, cut into serving pieces
  • 1 can tomato sauce
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 carrots, quartered
  • 3 potatoes,  quartered
  • 1 cup green peas
  • 1 red bell pepper, sliced
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • salt and pepper

Preparation

1. In a pan, saute garlic and onion in vegetable oil over medium
    heat.

2. Add chicken and cook until lightly browned.

3. Pour in water, tomato sauce and fish sauce and simmer for about 40
    minutes.

4. Add carrots and potatoes. Cook until tender.

5. Add red bell pepper and green peas.

6. Season with salt and pepper.


Saturday, November 9, 2013

Kangkong Salad


Kangkong or water spinach is grown near irrigation canals, creeks, ponds and other watery areas. Since kangkong is grown in watery areas, make sure to buy kangkong which are harvested from clean water sources.

It is considered a versatile vegetable since it can be sauteed, steamed or added in soups and salad. It is also rich in iron and other nutrients.

This dish only takes about 15 minutes to prepare. Hope you try it!

Ingredients
  • 1 bunch kangkong (blanched and drained)
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • 2 tomatoes, quartered
  • 2 tbsp vinegar
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/8 tsp sugar

Preparation

1. Combine onion, tomatoes, vinegar, salt and sugar in a bowl.

2. Add the kangkong leaves.

3. Toss and serve.



Friday, November 8, 2013

Chicken Arroz Caldo

Arroz is the Spanish word for rice while caldo is derived from the Italian word, 'hot' or 'warm.' In other words, arroz caldo means 'hot rice.'

Arroz caldo is a type of congee (rice porridge). There are different types of congee or lugaw (rice porridge). It can be served with chicken, beef tripe, diced tofu and pork (tokwa't baboy) and others.

Among the different types of congee, I love to eat chicken arroz caldo (chicken rice porridge). It is one of my comfort foods - rain or shine. I love the combination of chicken and rice porridge garnished with spring onion, fried garlic and some calamansi. Enjoy!


Ingredients
  • 5 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 medium onion, sliced
  • few slices of ginger
  • 500 gms chicken, cut into serving pieces
  • 5 cups water
  • 1/2 cup glutinous rice
  • 2 tsp vegetable oil
  • 4 stalks spring onion, finely chopped
  • fish sauce (patis)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tsp safflower (casubha)
  • calamansi
  • boiled egg (optional)

Preparation

1. Fry garlic in vegetable oil over medium heat. Set aside.

2. In the same pot, saute onion and ginger.

3. Add chicken and cook until lightly browned. Season with fish sauce.

4. Combine water and rice. Boil for about 45 minutes.

5. Add safflower and stir occasionally.

6. Season with salt and pepper. 

7. Garnish with fried garlic, spring onion and calamansi.